Path of the Priestess

There are so many paths that you can walk when you practice paganism. I could write entire books just outlining all the paths you can take when you practice paganism. Finding the path that is right for you is just as hard as finding a career that you love. Sometimes, you can line up your pagan path so that it walks in tandem with your career path but most of the time, your pagan path is a private one.

I have chosen to walk the path of a Priestess. This is heavy title in the pagan community, particularly with its association with the High Priestess title in Wicca. It implies leadership in the community and it comes with responsibility, not only to other pagans but to your chosen path. My coven has a ranking system but we don’t have any hierarchy systems. We use levels of engagement to earn our three ranks: Seedling (beginner), Sapling (intermediate), and Tree (advanced). I currently have the rank of Tree as I am in my third year as a founder of the Coven.

I am a follower of the Wheel of the Year which encoupasses both Norse and Celtic practices. I have basically turned my home into a covenstead because I not only have the room to do so but also the time to devote to practice. There are lots of ways people can lead their communities. I have chosen to do so via this blog and in person with my coven.

Finding training in a clergy/mystic path is difficult for pretty much everyone who wants to deepen their pagan spiritual practice. Giving how few trained mystics there are in the world, it’s almost impossible to get one-on-one training. Even the distance education and online courses that are offered do not make up for that master-student relationship. I have attempted these paths a few times and I was not met with much success.

I have walked a solitary path for years and pretty much the majority of my education has been self-training. I was my own teacher and my own guide. It was my training to become a yoga teacher that taught me that I can be my own best teacher. I can gain guidance from others but at the end of the day, I am the one who has to do the work, make the connections, and come to my own conclusions. I have to have be the one to come to my own “ah ha!” moments of realization.

The path of the mystic in any religious tradition is not looked well upon by the eyes of science. In a society were seeing is believing, many things that they mystic sees and experiences cannot be quantified by traditional science. Most mystics run the risk of being called out as Charlatans and quacks for their non-scientific views and practices. I keep many of my own experiences to myself so that I can avoid uncomfortable conversations with people who just don’t get it. You cannot teach a mind that is already full of its own ideas. If someone is to come to the realization that our world is more complex than science can offer at this time, then they will come to spiritual mysticism on their own.

As part of my offering as a pagan Priestess, I will be posting a Foundations of Pagan Practice series on this site for both new pagans and older pagans looking to deepen their own practice by going off the beaten path. It has been my goal since starting this blog back in May to create this series.

As part of my own growth as a pagan, I will continue to share things that I learned and insights that I have gained through my own practice. I will continue to question what it means to be a Priestess and explore other paths.

Spiritsong Dreamweaver


Celebrating Norse Pagan Music

Over the last year or so, I have been collecting my favorite Norse themed pagan music by some of the most notable artists out there.

Have a listen and enjoy !

Spiritsong Dreamweaver

Rebirth of the Spirit

The winter solstice has come at last. The dark time of the year has come to an end and the sun is reborn. The days start getting longer but we are also in the coldest time of the year. On the one had light is returning but we must endure six more weeks of winter chill before spring arrives on February first.

I celebrated this solstice with my coven. We had a feast dedicated to Freyr and had a blot to the Norse gods, spirits of the land, and our ancestors. We made a sacrifice of red wine on the outdoor altar. After that, we sat around the outdoor sacred fire pit in our winter cloths for a journey to our sacred thirteen oaks to seek wisdom for the new year. It was minus 17 degrees celcius out there but there was something peaceful about listening to the fire cracks while the wind blew at our backs. Each of us received a vision from the flames that was meant just for us.

My vision was reflective of my inner conflict. Lately, I have been struggling with what it means to be a pagan priestess. Even the words themselves don’t feel right. I am not a leader but I do have special knowledge and experience in my pagan path to share. I am forced to walk the path of a spiritual leader, teacher, and practitioner. Since I am in such a small community of pagans, we have very few pagan leaders and teachers, which means that any of us who have even just a few years experience are forced onto a path that we might not be best suited for.

Taking control of your own spiritual path is one of the most exhilarating experiences you can have. When I say you are your best teacher, I mean it. You don’t need someone to show you the way, you know the way, you have always known it. Having someone feed you directions will likely only get you lost. As the old saying goes, there’s more than one path up the mountain. That is to say that just because one person found a “safe path” up, does not mean that your path will be just as safe. In the same way that all snowflakes look exactly the same before they fall to Earth, they change as they fall until each one is completely different from the others.

I have been contemplating the title of “priestess” as is stands right now. I have been feeling that the term I have been using is too akin to that of the Wiccan system. I am not a High Priestess nor will I ever be. I do not practice Wiccan ritual magic and I do not fully follow the Wiccan belief system.. My own practice is more akin to that of shaman or in the Norse tradition, a Seiðr or a Völva. I have some ideas for how I want to grow my pagan path next year and I have been given some ideas on how to do that.

This past summer, I spent a full moon cycle working with Goddess energy. This year, I want to grow on that experience and bring in my work with the Gods. I won’t be dividing my time though, I will walk with both types of energies. I will likely be spending more time on research for the Norse traditions. I have been feeling more and more drawn to Norse energies over the last few years. Some of the ways in which I plan on bringing better understanding to the ways of my ancestors is to revive some of their domestic practices, including clothing, food, and fishing and hunting. I don’t want to just become a reenactor but more of a revivalist. In our modern age of industrialization and mechanization, it’s easy to lose touch with our roots.

I look to cultures like the Sami who have managed to keep their roots and participate in our modern world. While much of their culture has been forced to change to other spiritual beliefs in recent centuries, they too are finding revival in their spiritual connection to the gods of old. I would argue that since our culture is so caught up in consumerism, it’s very difficult for us to break away from it. It’s so much more easy to buy food, clothes, and other possessions than it is to make them ourselves. The only this is costs us is hours of our lives to fill someone else’s consumer need. We are literally trading our lives for stuff.

This holiday season, my family and I agreed to go on a trip instead of doing gifts. My brother and I are at the point in our lives where we don’t need any gifts. So instead of getting more stuff, our family is investing in time and an experience together. We are going to Hawaii for sixteen days. This will be the longest family vacation we have taken in years and the first non-Californian vacation since our Grand Canyon trip in 1992. Needless to say, we are long overdue for taking a trip together like this. I have been looking forward to this trip since we first decided on it in June. It will be nice to have a change of setting for a while and not worry about everyday life for a bit.

Hawaii has always been a place that holds a special magic, in particular the Goddess Pele. I am fortunate that we have chosen to go to the Big Island, Hawaii herself where the volcano Goddess Pele lives. I cannot wait to see the act of island creation at its source and see where lava spill into the ocean giving way to new life. Part of me thinks that it will be hard to get me away from this island once I get there. The only other place that holds this same kind of magic for me is Iceland.

I have been waiting for the Asatru temple in Iceland to be finished before I go there. I don’t expect it to be a long trip, maybe a week but I don’t want to go until that temple is finished. I wish that we had something like that here in Canada or even in British Columbia. We don’t have any dedicated pagan temples where I live. It’s not that we don’t have a vibrant community that could sustain it if one was built, it’s the work that it takes to get said temple off the ground. What will likely have to happen is an elderly pagan will have to give an endowment in order to get the process started. Kind of like how someone in my hometown had to give the land to the Catholic hall in order for it to have been built in the 1980s. Not there there aren’t enough empty churches in Kelowna, we just don’t have the capital to get them off of the ground. Talk about a lifetime goal. I hope that one day, I will have land to build some sort of covenstead on it. Of course, that’s getting way ahead of myself. For now, I will just focus on my personal pagan path and growing my own tradition.

Spiritsong Dreamweaver

Shape Shifting

When I was a child, I used to like to play pretend. You remember this game, right? You would pick an animal, a character, or a roll and then pretend to be them. My favorites were creatures like squirrels, otters, wolves, dinosaurs, and mermaids.

As I grew up and stopped playing children’s games, I lost a bit of that wonder that you get from becoming a different creature. What I didn’t know as a child was that I was practicing an elementary form of shapeshifting. That is, allowing the spirit of the creature you are challenging to join with you and you take on aspects of that creature.

This is different from spending time with a spirit animal during a journey session. If you have any experience with shape shifting, than you know that when you choose to merge with an animal energy, you bring certain aspects of that animal into your physical and emotional being. For example, if you wish to bring better sight for seeing in the dark, you might call upon the energy of an owl. If you want to be more playful, you might call upon the otter to help you loosen up.

You don’t need to pick animals, you can choose things like dragons, unicorns, and griffins. Keep in mind that what you want to get out of these creatures will depend on what you perceive their energies to be. If you associate dragons with danger, then you will bring that energy into your being but if you perceive dragons to be beings of infinite wisdom, then that’s the energy you will bring into yourself.

You don’t have to be a master of shamanic arts in order to bring small aspects of shapeshifting into your everyday life. All you need to do is go back to your practice of sympathetic magic. Set your intention and then bring physical objects to help you pull out the energy you want to bring into yourself.

Here’s a few ways you can do this:

  • Find a piece of jewellery that represents the spirit you want to hone the energies of
  • Wear an outfit that reminds you of the spirit you want to embody
  • Keep a picture, statute, or some object that represents the spirit on your altar
  • Do a ritual where you can evoke the spirit or invoke the spirit into you

You can use any spiritual being you feel a connection with. This can be an animal, a god or goddess, a mythical creature, or an archetype. Sometimes, I like to take on energies from fictional characters that I like to embody. If you are wanting adventure, you might want to call upon Bilbo Baggins or Jack Sparrow or if you want to take on a strong, independent women, you might want to take on Scarlett O’Hara or Elizabeth Bennet.

I will get more into what invoking rituals in the future and the benefits to them. I have touched upon it in the past with my evoking vs. invoking article but this is a subject that needs a deeper level of discussion. You might say that shape shifting is an introduction to invoking.

Blessed Be,

~Priestess Spiritsong

Out of the Broom Closet

There are still people out there that fear witches. I would say without any real good reason but it’s enough that some witches and pagans feel the need to hide their beliefs and practices from their friends, family, and coworkers. It’s what we in the community call, “Staying in the broom closet.”

I am most definitely out of the broom closet. I have have been since I was in college. At first, it was just with friends and immediate family but over time, I became more public about it. With the changes in technology and the adaption of social media, it is easier to be “out” as a witch then ever before. I have been writing pagan blogs for a few years now and been part of a few public pagan organizations in my community. I have no problems talking about my beliefs and practices with the public or being a public face for witches and pagans.

I can understand why some people would want to stay out of the public with their beliefs. I remember a friend who once told me that I was going to hell because of my witchcraft. I remember being really hurt by that because I don’t actually believe in a “hell” or the concept of “sin”, I believe in morality & ethics, not sin & damnation. However, that does not stop others from forcing their beliefs upon me. That being said, I know now that my friend was coming from a place of love, even if a little misdirected. One should never come to any religion or belief out of fear because fear only begets more fear. Since that time, I have come to just say, “Thank you for your thoughts of concern,” to those who attack me for my beliefs. I can tell you, it’s only happened once in the last ten year from a guy who came to Jesus out of his fear of damnation. I guess he figured just by being close to pagans, he would be damn to Hell (I always ask, is that one “L” or two?). Fun fact, the words “God” and “Hell” both come from old Norse and they refer to Odin, ruler of the Norse Gods, and Hel, the place where the dishonored go when they die.

I remain public with my pagan practice because I want to create a world where everyone can practice their spirituality without fear. I do not live in any kind of fear of what someone will try to do to me because I know that I have the laws of my country on my side. That and the confidence that most people don’t actually care what I believe and practice.

If you are still waiting to come out as a witch or pagan, take your time. There’s no rushing these things but when you do, know that there are others out there like you and will be there to support you.

Blessed be!

Priestess Spiritsong Dreamweaver

First Week of the 28 Days of the Walking the Path of the Goddess

This week has been awesome for me. I have really enjoyed setting aside time to sing my mantra on my mala beads, sit in silence with the Goddess, practice yoga, and write in my journal.

This week has been awesome for me. I have really enjoyed setting aside time to sing my mantra on my mala beads, sit in silence with the Goddess, practice yoga, and write in my journal.

To start my devotional practice, I do some yoga. It’s usually about 10-15 minutes of a practice. Then I sit on my meditation set and do my 108 mala mantra ring. Then I sit in silence with the Goddess and allow her to be present with me. At the end, I pull out my journal and write about my day, my thoughts, and my feelings. The practice tends to take me anywhere between 30 minutes to an hour depending on what I end up doing in my yoga practice or my silent time.

I think that I picked a really good time to start this practice. My life has been moving in all sorts of directions I had not anticipated in the last few months. I am on a pause from teaching yoga, I am single again, I just about lost a close friend to depression, and my job is no longer challenging me and I have no growth aspirations within in.

While doing this practice, I realized that it’s time for me to move forward with my life. I decided to start the ball rolling with getting my teaching degree. I had a meeting with an academic adviser and we discussed what I would need to do to apply and what I should do while I am saving up the funds to return to school for upgrading. I have been advised to contact the administration of the local schools to offer up my services as a volunteer in the schools. I didn’t even know that this was something I could do but apparently it’s very common to have prospective students of the teaching program do this.

I also need to add a few missing courses and upgrade my GPA. I will be enrolling in the human kinetics courses and the Okanagan Collage in order to get the 24 credits I need to specialize in teaching physical education along with history.  I am really excited about this because it will not only be helpful when looking for teaching jobs but it will also help my yoga teaching by gaining a better understanding of how the body works and memorization of human anatomy.

I expect to enroll at the Okanagan Collage in 2019 to start the upgrading process. It will likely take me about two years to upgrade the 10 classes that I need but hopefully by then, I will know for certain that teaching is what I would like to do. Volunteering in the high schools around town will give me the opportunity to do that. I have been very resistant to returning to school because I do not wish to go back into debt, so this time, I will be paying for all of the courses myself and I am giving myself time to save up to do it.

I am not giving up on being a yoga teacher though. I have been making sure to attend a yoga class once a week for the last few. It’s been good for me to just be in class again. I have missed learning and being in a class setting. I am learning about how the flow of the classes at Tandava work so that when I get the email about upcoming fill ins are posted, I can volunteer to help out.

In conclusion, this week has been very good for moving energy in my life to the places that I need it. I can’t wait to see what shifts in the three weeks left.

Blessed Be,

Priestess Spiritsong Dreamweaver



How I Came to Being a Pagan

I have always been a child of nature. I have the luxury of growing up close to the wild outdoors and spending a lot of time exploring. When I was kid, I used to pretend I was a witch like the ones in Hocus Pocus (just not evil like they are).

It was the spring of 1998 and I was 15 years old, my mom and I visited a new metaphysical store in Salmon Arm called, “Spirit Quest: Books & Gifts”. This was the first metaphysical store I could remember being in and on the shelf there was a whole section of Wicca & Witchcraft books. I had been watching a lot of Charmed and Buffy the Vampire Slayer and had learned about Wicca from doing some online searches. The internet was so new to me that I didn’t really know what to look for. So, my mom let me get a copy of Scott Cunningham’s “Wicca for a Solitary Practitioner”.

From there, I learned the basics of meditation, altar set up, the spirituality of the Horned God & Moon Goddess, the Wheel of the Year, and ritual magic work. I kept a book of shadows, I created my first wand from a branch in the woods, and used a pocket knife as my first athame. I spent many hours in meditation and contemplation of the Goddess and God. I created my first spells, mostly for love like many teenage girls do.

I was mostly private about my practices during my years in high school. I had a few friends who were interested but no one really wanted to start a coven. It wasn’t until I was in university when I started seeking out other witches and pagans. I met some of the local priesthood and various other practitioners through Witches Vox and yahoo groups but I still kept mostly to myself.

There was a brief time where I was exploring other paths like Christianity, Buddhism, and Shinto. I almost converted to Christianity but at the end of the day, I knew that I was pagan. I could not get on board with a religion that was so unforgiving to women and other beliefs.

I reached a point in 2013 where I wanted to deepen my experience with my practice, so I joined up with a teaching coven out of Vernon, BC. I learned more about the Wiccan ritual format for coven work, esbats, and sabbats. Eventually, I reached a point where I wanted something less formal in my practice and less hierarchical with my group work.

I ended up leaving that Wiccan tradition in the fall of 2015 and started a new tradition with two other pagan friends who also wanted to start coven work but under our own terms. Since that time, we have been working forming our own style of ritual work, learning shamanic practices, and playing with our own spell work. We are in our second year of work and we are just getting our style down.

Today, I have a strange mix of Wiccan, Druid, Norse, and Hindu beliefs. I am a certified yoga teacher and I have been bringing elements of that into my pagan practice. They go so well with European pagan traditions that it’s not hard to weave them together. I am what most would call an eclectic witch and pagan.

Merry Met!

Priestess Spiritsong Dreamweaver