Path of the Priestess

There are so many paths that you can walk when you practice paganism. I could write entire books just outlining all the paths you can take when you practice paganism. Finding the path that is right for you is just as hard as finding a career that you love. Sometimes, you can line up your pagan path so that it walks in tandem with your career path but most of the time, your pagan path is a private one.

I have chosen to walk the path of a Priestess. This is heavy title in the pagan community, particularly with its association with the High Priestess title in Wicca. It implies leadership in the community and it comes with responsibility, not only to other pagans but to your chosen path. My coven has a ranking system but we don’t have any hierarchy systems. We use levels of engagement to earn our three ranks: Seedling (beginner), Sapling (intermediate), and Tree (advanced). I currently have the rank of Tree as I am in my third year as a founder of the Coven.

I am a follower of the Wheel of the Year which encoupasses both Norse and Celtic practices. I have basically turned my home into a covenstead because I not only have the room to do so but also the time to devote to practice. There are lots of ways people can lead their communities. I have chosen to do so via this blog and in person with my coven.

Finding training in a clergy/mystic path is difficult for pretty much everyone who wants to deepen their pagan spiritual practice. Giving how few trained mystics there are in the world, it’s almost impossible to get one-on-one training. Even the distance education and online courses that are offered do not make up for that master-student relationship. I have attempted these paths a few times and I was not met with much success.

I have walked a solitary path for years and pretty much the majority of my education has been self-training. I was my own teacher and my own guide. It was my training to become a yoga teacher that taught me that I can be my own best teacher. I can gain guidance from others but at the end of the day, I am the one who has to do the work, make the connections, and come to my own conclusions. I have to have be the one to come to my own “ah ha!” moments of realization.

The path of the mystic in any religious tradition is not looked well upon by the eyes of science. In a society were seeing is believing, many things that they mystic sees and experiences cannot be quantified by traditional science. Most mystics run the risk of being called out as Charlatans and quacks for their non-scientific views and practices. I keep many of my own experiences to myself so that I can avoid uncomfortable conversations with people who just don’t get it. You cannot teach a mind that is already full of its own ideas. If someone is to come to the realization that our world is more complex than science can offer at this time, then they will come to spiritual mysticism on their own.

As part of my offering as a pagan Priestess, I will be posting a Foundations of Pagan Practice series on this site for both new pagans and older pagans looking to deepen their own practice by going off the beaten path. It has been my goal since starting this blog back in May to create this series.

As part of my own growth as a pagan, I will continue to share things that I learned and insights that I have gained through my own practice. I will continue to question what it means to be a Priestess and explore other paths.

Spiritsong Dreamweaver


Full Moons of 2018

Part of my practice is following the moon cycles, not only the lunar ones but also my biological one as well. I have put together a chart for you to keep track of when the next full moon is happening in 2018.

Spirisong Dreamweaver

Month Name Description
Tuesday, January 2, 2018

02:25 AM

Full Wolf Moon This full Moon appeared when wolves howled in hunger outside the villages. It is also known as the Old Moon. To some Native American tribes, this was the Snow Moon, but most applied that name to the next full Moon, in February.
Wednesday, January 31, 2018

01:27 PM

Blue Moon

Full Snow Moon Usually the heaviest snows fall in February. Hunting becomes very difficult, and hence to some Native American tribes this was the Hunger Moon.
Friday, March 2, 2018

12:52 AM

Saturday, March 31, 2018

12:37 PM

Blue Moon

Full Worm Moon At the time of this spring Moon, the ground begins to soften and earthworm casts reappear, inviting the return of robins. This is also known as the Sap Moon, as it marks the time when maple sap begins to flow and the annual tapping of maple trees begins.
Monday, April 30, 201812:59 AM Full Pink Moon This full Moon heralded the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox—one of the first spring flowers. It is also known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Fish Moon.
Tuesday, May 29, 2018

02:20 PM

Full Flower Moon Flowers spring forth in abundance this month. Some Algonquin tribes knew this full Moon as the Corn Planting Moon or the Milk Moon.
Thursday, June 28, 2018

04:54 AM

Full Strawberry Moon The Algonquin tribes knew this Moon as a time to gather ripening strawberries. It is also known as the Rose Moon and the Hot Moon.
Friday, July 27, 2018

08:22 PM

Full Buck Moon At this time, a buck’s antlers are in full growth mode. This full Moon was also known as the Thunder Moon, because thunderstorms are so frequent during this month.
Sunday, August 26, 2018

11:58 AM

Full Sturgeon Moon Some Native American tribes knew that the sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain were most readily caught during this full Moon. Others called it the Green Corn Moon.
Tuesday, September 25, 2018

02:54 AM

Full Corn Moon This full Moon corresponds with the time of harvesting corn. It is also called the Barley Moon, because it is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley. The Harvest Moon is the full Moon nearest the autumnal equinox, which can occur in September or October and is bright enough to allow finishing of all the harvest chores.
Wednesday, October 24, 2018

04:47 PM

Full Hunter’s Moon This is the month when the leaves are falling and the game is fattened. Now is the time for hunting and laying in a store of provisions for the long winter ahead. October’s Moon is also known as the Travel Moon and the Dying Moon.
Friday, November 23, 2018

05:41 AM

Full Beaver Moon

Full Beaver Moon For both the colonists and the Algonquin tribes, this was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. This full Moon was also called the Frost Moon.
Saturday, December 22, 2018

05:50 PM

Full Cold Moon This is the month when the winter cold fastens its grip and the nights become long and dark. This full Moon is also called the Long Nights Moon by some Native American tribes.

Rebirth of the Spirit

The winter solstice has come at last. The dark time of the year has come to an end and the sun is reborn. The days start getting longer but we are also in the coldest time of the year. On the one had light is returning but we must endure six more weeks of winter chill before spring arrives on February first.

I celebrated this solstice with my coven. We had a feast dedicated to Freyr and had a blot to the Norse gods, spirits of the land, and our ancestors. We made a sacrifice of red wine on the outdoor altar. After that, we sat around the outdoor sacred fire pit in our winter cloths for a journey to our sacred thirteen oaks to seek wisdom for the new year. It was minus 17 degrees celcius out there but there was something peaceful about listening to the fire cracks while the wind blew at our backs. Each of us received a vision from the flames that was meant just for us.

My vision was reflective of my inner conflict. Lately, I have been struggling with what it means to be a pagan priestess. Even the words themselves don’t feel right. I am not a leader but I do have special knowledge and experience in my pagan path to share. I am forced to walk the path of a spiritual leader, teacher, and practitioner. Since I am in such a small community of pagans, we have very few pagan leaders and teachers, which means that any of us who have even just a few years experience are forced onto a path that we might not be best suited for.

Taking control of your own spiritual path is one of the most exhilarating experiences you can have. When I say you are your best teacher, I mean it. You don’t need someone to show you the way, you know the way, you have always known it. Having someone feed you directions will likely only get you lost. As the old saying goes, there’s more than one path up the mountain. That is to say that just because one person found a “safe path” up, does not mean that your path will be just as safe. In the same way that all snowflakes look exactly the same before they fall to Earth, they change as they fall until each one is completely different from the others.

I have been contemplating the title of “priestess” as is stands right now. I have been feeling that the term I have been using is too akin to that of the Wiccan system. I am not a High Priestess nor will I ever be. I do not practice Wiccan ritual magic and I do not fully follow the Wiccan belief system.. My own practice is more akin to that of shaman or in the Norse tradition, a Seiðr or a Völva. I have some ideas for how I want to grow my pagan path next year and I have been given some ideas on how to do that.

This past summer, I spent a full moon cycle working with Goddess energy. This year, I want to grow on that experience and bring in my work with the Gods. I won’t be dividing my time though, I will walk with both types of energies. I will likely be spending more time on research for the Norse traditions. I have been feeling more and more drawn to Norse energies over the last few years. Some of the ways in which I plan on bringing better understanding to the ways of my ancestors is to revive some of their domestic practices, including clothing, food, and fishing and hunting. I don’t want to just become a reenactor but more of a revivalist. In our modern age of industrialization and mechanization, it’s easy to lose touch with our roots.

I look to cultures like the Sami who have managed to keep their roots and participate in our modern world. While much of their culture has been forced to change to other spiritual beliefs in recent centuries, they too are finding revival in their spiritual connection to the gods of old. I would argue that since our culture is so caught up in consumerism, it’s very difficult for us to break away from it. It’s so much more easy to buy food, clothes, and other possessions than it is to make them ourselves. The only this is costs us is hours of our lives to fill someone else’s consumer need. We are literally trading our lives for stuff.

This holiday season, my family and I agreed to go on a trip instead of doing gifts. My brother and I are at the point in our lives where we don’t need any gifts. So instead of getting more stuff, our family is investing in time and an experience together. We are going to Hawaii for sixteen days. This will be the longest family vacation we have taken in years and the first non-Californian vacation since our Grand Canyon trip in 1992. Needless to say, we are long overdue for taking a trip together like this. I have been looking forward to this trip since we first decided on it in June. It will be nice to have a change of setting for a while and not worry about everyday life for a bit.

Hawaii has always been a place that holds a special magic, in particular the Goddess Pele. I am fortunate that we have chosen to go to the Big Island, Hawaii herself where the volcano Goddess Pele lives. I cannot wait to see the act of island creation at its source and see where lava spill into the ocean giving way to new life. Part of me thinks that it will be hard to get me away from this island once I get there. The only other place that holds this same kind of magic for me is Iceland.

I have been waiting for the Asatru temple in Iceland to be finished before I go there. I don’t expect it to be a long trip, maybe a week but I don’t want to go until that temple is finished. I wish that we had something like that here in Canada or even in British Columbia. We don’t have any dedicated pagan temples where I live. It’s not that we don’t have a vibrant community that could sustain it if one was built, it’s the work that it takes to get said temple off the ground. What will likely have to happen is an elderly pagan will have to give an endowment in order to get the process started. Kind of like how someone in my hometown had to give the land to the Catholic hall in order for it to have been built in the 1980s. Not there there aren’t enough empty churches in Kelowna, we just don’t have the capital to get them off of the ground. Talk about a lifetime goal. I hope that one day, I will have land to build some sort of covenstead on it. Of course, that’s getting way ahead of myself. For now, I will just focus on my personal pagan path and growing my own tradition.

Spiritsong Dreamweaver

Samhain: Remembering our Ancestors

We are fast approaching the third and final harvest sabbat, Samhain. November 1st marks the time to give rest to all of the autumns harvests and setting in for the long dark of winter.

In olden days, this would have marked the harvest of those animals that will not make it through the winter and the start of preserving their flesh with smoke or salt. Today, we no longer need to wait until the coming of winter to prepare our stores of food. We just walk down to our local supermarket and pick up what we want.

There are so few of us who could understand what it took for our ancestors to make it through a winter and how important it was that every member of a household do their part in making sure that everyone made it through. In my local community, we go to the cemetery and spend time with the forgotten dead. It’s impossible for us to know the lives of all those who have died in our community since its founding but we can spend time to acknowledge their lives and their contributions to our community.

On a more personal level, Samhain is a good time for you to spend time remembering those people in your life who are no longer with you. I am sure that you have lost someone close to you and whether or not it was recent or someone you never had a chance to know in your lifetime like a great grand parents, Samhain offers you that space to reach out to their memory and give thanks to them for their role in your life.

For me, there are two people who I never had a chance to meet in my life because they died long before I was even a thought. They are my mother’s parents, Bill and Peggy Mitchell. Everything that I know about them is second hand knowledge from my mother and her siblings. I know that Peggy was a swimmer training to go to the Berlin Olympics but wasn’t able to go. I know that Bill was a life guard on the beach where he and Peggy met. I wish that I knew more about them but that most of their lives are lost to the memories of those who cannot tell me their stories.

There are other stories lost to time. I don’t know why my ancestors left the shores of Europe. I don’t know what adventures they had. I don’t know their hopes or their dreams. All I do know is that I would not be here if it were not for these people.

How you honor your ancestors is really up to you. I tend to create an altar for them and I burn incense in their honor. This year, I will be doing some journey work to meet up with my first ancestors. I hope to find out more about my roots and where my pagan blood comes from.


I will also be celebrating Halloween by decorating my home, carving a pumpkin, and handing out sweets to the neighbor kids who come by our door. I will put on my best witch get up and welcome the trick-or-treaters with a smile. For children, this is a special night where they get to be whoever they want to be and get candy. I loved Halloween as a child. I loved running around the houses and collecting candy.

I hope that you have a safe and happy Halloween and a peaceful Samhain this year!

Blessed Be,

Priestess Spiritsong

Mabon Equinox

By now, you have have noticed that the hours of daylight are getting shorter and the nights are getting cooler. The Autumnal Equinox and the solar festival of Mabon are here at long last. This is the second of the harvest festivals and marks the beginning of the dark time of the year.

Mabon is my favorite of all of the wheel of the year festivals. Since I live in an area where there are so many apple orchards and vineyards, I feel the strong pull of this season. As a child growing up, thanksgiving was my favorite of the family holidays and for me, Mabon marks the start of that season.

My coven is celebrating our second anniversary this Mabon. We named ourselves the Coven of the Oak and Apple in honor of both the Oak trees that grow all around us and the apple orchards that thrive in our valley. The Oak tree represents our connection of the God energy and the Apple tree represents our connection to the Goddess energy. We use acorns, oak leaves, and apple starts in our clothing and decorations.

The ritual work I do with my coven is often different from the work I will do on my own time. I like to do big magical work with my coven but all my personal work, I do on my own and my coven mates do theirs. Being in a coven is great for getting help with large issues that need more energy behind them. Coven members become like family if you let them in. I share all of my fears and insecurities with them and they help me to overcome them without feeling like I am being judged. When times are tough, we come together to support each other.

Finding pagans that you click with is actually pretty hard. I live in a pretty Christian city and out pagan population is definitely a minority here. There’s plenty of new age people but not a lot of them follow the path of the old gods or want to bring these kinds of practices into their everyday life. I will admit that I struggled with being public about my beliefs for a long time. This was when I was worried about how my beliefs would impact my employment status. These days, I don’t care about that at all. I am out of the broom closet for good now.

For my own personal work this Mabon, I am giving thanks for all of the lessons that I have been gifted this year. Some of them were harsh lessons that I had to learn about myself and what I want out of my life and relationships. I am at a bit of a crossroads as to what to do next and what I want. I feel like I am on the next stage of my life but I am not sure what I want to put my energy into. That’s one of the hard parts of doing ritual work, figuring out what you want to put your energy into.

Since we are at the harvest season, now is not the time to start something new but rather to reflect on what we have received. I am thankful for being able to reconnect with old friends, for the chance to reevaluate my life and needs, and for growing stronger.

Blessed Be!

~Priestess Spiritsong

Mabon Altar set up #pagan #paganpriestess #covenoftheoakandapple

A post shared by Witch of the Wildmoon (@witchofthewildmoon) on

Top down #mabon #altar #pagan #paganpriestess #covenoftheoakandapple

A post shared by Witch of the Wildmoon (@witchofthewildmoon) on

Shape Shifting

When I was a child, I used to like to play pretend. You remember this game, right? You would pick an animal, a character, or a roll and then pretend to be them. My favorites were creatures like squirrels, otters, wolves, dinosaurs, and mermaids.

As I grew up and stopped playing children’s games, I lost a bit of that wonder that you get from becoming a different creature. What I didn’t know as a child was that I was practicing an elementary form of shapeshifting. That is, allowing the spirit of the creature you are challenging to join with you and you take on aspects of that creature.

This is different from spending time with a spirit animal during a journey session. If you have any experience with shape shifting, than you know that when you choose to merge with an animal energy, you bring certain aspects of that animal into your physical and emotional being. For example, if you wish to bring better sight for seeing in the dark, you might call upon the energy of an owl. If you want to be more playful, you might call upon the otter to help you loosen up.

You don’t need to pick animals, you can choose things like dragons, unicorns, and griffins. Keep in mind that what you want to get out of these creatures will depend on what you perceive their energies to be. If you associate dragons with danger, then you will bring that energy into your being but if you perceive dragons to be beings of infinite wisdom, then that’s the energy you will bring into yourself.

You don’t have to be a master of shamanic arts in order to bring small aspects of shapeshifting into your everyday life. All you need to do is go back to your practice of sympathetic magic. Set your intention and then bring physical objects to help you pull out the energy you want to bring into yourself.

Here’s a few ways you can do this:

  • Find a piece of jewellery that represents the spirit you want to hone the energies of
  • Wear an outfit that reminds you of the spirit you want to embody
  • Keep a picture, statute, or some object that represents the spirit on your altar
  • Do a ritual where you can evoke the spirit or invoke the spirit into you

You can use any spiritual being you feel a connection with. This can be an animal, a god or goddess, a mythical creature, or an archetype. Sometimes, I like to take on energies from fictional characters that I like to embody. If you are wanting adventure, you might want to call upon Bilbo Baggins or Jack Sparrow or if you want to take on a strong, independent women, you might want to take on Scarlett O’Hara or Elizabeth Bennet.

I will get more into what invoking rituals in the future and the benefits to them. I have touched upon it in the past with my evoking vs. invoking article but this is a subject that needs a deeper level of discussion. You might say that shape shifting is an introduction to invoking.

Blessed Be,

~Priestess Spiritsong